The research says high quality preschool does benefit kids

First, if one really believes that today’s preschool programs are much less effective than the Perry Preschool and Abecedarian programs because those programs were so much more costly and intensive, and started earlier, then the logical conclusion is that today’s programs should be better funded, more intensive, and start earlier. I would agree. Head Start needs to be put on steroids. New Jersey’s Abbott pre-K model (discussed later) starts at 3 and provides a guide as it has been found to have solid long-term effects on achievement and school success.

Please visit National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) for the complete blog post.

If Everyone Wants Preschool, Why Isn’t It Growing?

As always, Fawn Johnson poses insightful, but difficult, questions. One reason that preschool policy has not advanced more successfully despite overwhelming popular support is that those who oppose it wield considerable clout. Opponents across political leanings often assert that no public money should be used to help the middle class, though research shows that children of all income levels can benefit. Special interests of all stripes prioritize their needs over those of young children generally, and researchers and advocates are forced to set the research record straight.

Please visit National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) for the complete blog post.

Overcoming the Pitfalls of Early Childhood Assessment

In the age of accountability, data collection seems to be in vogue. Data are now routinely collected nationwide on children, classrooms, and teachers. The data help teachers and schools improve their programs to meet the needs of children attending. Most states are conducting child assessments in early childhood classrooms (including Kindergarten Entry Assessments). The relevant literature has classified two types of assessment for children, summative and formative.

Please visit National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) for the complete blog post.

Is New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio’s method for expanding Pre-K a model for other cities?

Whether NYC offers a good model for other cities to follow in expanding pre-K is something that we will only know after some years. However, it is not too soon to say that NYC offers one important lesson for other cities. When adequate funding is available, cities (and states) can expand enrollment quickly on a large scale at high standards.

Please visit National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) for the complete blog post.

“Fadeout” in Early Childhood: Does the hype match the research?

As teachers and students alike head back to classrooms, the hopes and dreams of another school year lie on the horizon. Parents are sending their children off to preschool for the big “first day of school,” especially in New York City, where 50,000 children have enrolled in the city’s expanded pre-K program, nervous and excited to see the difference in their child a year from now. Kindergarten teachers frequently say they can tell the difference between children who attended high-quality preschool from those who did not, but what does the research tell us about the lingering benefits of pre-k?

Please visit National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) for the complete blog post.

Anticipating quality for all children

I remember the anticipation each fall as school was about to begin. So much was going on in my mind. Who was going to be in my class? What kind of year was it going to be? What were we going to learn? I was excited. I was nervous. These memories are not from when I was four or five, but rather when I was a teacher in the classroom. Twenty years ago this fall I began my tenure as an early childhood teacher. Although I no longer teach in the classroom, I still feel this excitement through my children’s eyes and through the work I do with teachers and leaders in the field.

Please visit National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) for the complete blog post.

Resources for early childhood teachers in teacher evaluation systems

The Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) wanted to know how states are incorporating early childhood teachers in their teacher evaluation systems, and additionally, whether requirements for evaluating early childhood teachers are different from teachers of higher grades. CEELO has done extensive work and produced many resources on teacher evaluation in early education classrooms, including producing a policy report on an extensive study of 11 states.

Please visit National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) for the complete blog post.

Evaluating the Teacher Evaluators

Educators of young children require certain unique skills that differ from those required for children in higher (and more-often tested) grades. Teachers of children in their first years of life lay the foundation of knowledge that children build on for the rest of their educational careers. Therefore, it is particularly important that educators in this field are highly knowledgeable on appropriate content and best teaching practices for young children. Evaluating teachers ensures we are holding educators accountable and gives teachers an opportunity to obtain professional development that will improve their skills.

Please visit National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) for the complete blog post.